how to keep bobcats away from chickens

Spray the chickens with water. These can attract coyotes and bring them closer to your chicken If you're not familiar with building fences or working with electronics, have the fence installed professionally. Bobcats are a massive threat to your chickens as they hunt with a litter. To help combat this type of behavior, simply surround the chicken's run with a 2 foot wide apron of hardware cloth. It is well-known that Llamas are used to protect flocks of sheep with lambs from predators. Also, strengthen your chicken coop to keep the bobcats out. So, how do you protect your flock so you do not have to worry about losing your poultry stock to raccoons, dogs, weasels, hawks, and more? It's important to repair damages and to reinforce the coop with chicken wire. Here are some ways you can keep bobcats out of your yard, away from your property and out of your chicken coop: Natural Deterrents. You might also want to set up a motion-activated light on the coop to scare off any predators that go near it at night. Your fence should be at least five feet high to protect your chickens. If you are not up for getting a dog, guinea fowl are also great guardians of the flock. How to Protect Chickens from Feral Animals, http://www.grit.com/animals/predators-of-chickens?pageid=2#PageContent2, http://www.ci.brainerd.mn.us/DocumentCenter/Home/View/469, http://articles.extension.org/pages/71204/predator-management-for-small-and-backyard-poultry-flocks, https://www.backyardchickencoops.com.au/can-you-keep-cats-and-chickens-together-in-the-same-backyard, proteger a los pollos de los animales salvajes, consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. But bobcats can crawl under fences and are very determined to find their prey at night. If you're worried that your chicken coop isn't secure enough, consider building or buying a new one that's elevated off the ground and covered with a roof, which will help keep out most predators. Or you may think that if you live in the suburbs or within city limits, you do not have to worry about predators. It connects to your garden hose and has a stake for sticking it securely in the ground. However, they are most likely to attack your flock during daylight hours. These 17 tips will help keep your ducks and chickens safe from predators in your back yard. Instead, invest in a welded wire hardware cloth. How to keep bobcats from killing your pets As modern as the world may be, wildlife still abounds. By using our site, you agree to our. Image by frank2037. We use cookies to make wikiHow great. How do I add protection to a pre-made coop? You can also invest in traps and guard dogs to repel predators. If you have fruit trees near your chicken coop, be on the lookout for fallen fruit. If you really can’t stand to see another ad again, then please consider supporting our work with a contribution to wikiHow. Unless you're very familiar with building yourself, it's best to have professionals build your chicken coop. You can also train Great Danes, Dobermans, Great Pyrenees, or any other large dog to get along with your chickens to discourage foraging bobcats and other predators. Learn more... Chickens can be very vulnerable to predators such as foxes, coyotes, and other carnivores. Traps can serve as a good potential offense against predators, but be sure to research the safest kind for the animal you need to catch and use them judiciously only when all other measures have failed. Bobcats and coyotes are fantastic jumpers and can easily clear 4-foot-high fences, so build your enclosure appropriately tall, or add a cover net to keep the varmints from vaulting the fence. I don't know much about bobcats so it's to the point where I'm scared to take my dog out at night. Something like this is ideal, placed away from your chicken run. {"smallUrl":"https:\/\/www.wikihow.com\/images\/thumb\/2\/2f\/Protect-Chickens-from-Feral-Animals-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\/v4-460px-Protect-Chickens-from-Feral-Animals-Step-1-Version-2.jpg","bigUrl":"\/images\/thumb\/2\/2f\/Protect-Chickens-from-Feral-Animals-Step-1-Version-2.jpg\/aid100128-v4-728px-Protect-Chickens-from-Feral-Animals-Step-1-Version-2.jpg","smallWidth":460,"smallHeight":345,"bigWidth":"728","bigHeight":"546","licensing":"

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\n<\/p><\/div>"}. Like most predators, bobcats can easily muscle through weak points of a fence post or coop. How I protect my chickens from predators in my context. Fencing must be at least six feet high with the bottom extending 6-12 inches below ground level. Mow the grass or field near or around the coop. This article has been viewed 66,489 times. % of people told us that this article helped them. Just be sure you have given equally serious consideration to safety and obey all laws. 9) Bobcats. Then, try a face-to-face interaction in which the chicken and cat are both restrained. Another option is an automatic coop door. Where to Buy Baby Chickens and Other Poultry Online, How to Raise and Keep Broody Hens for Eggs, Easy Chicken Care Tasks to Make Part of Your Routine, Chicken Breeds for the Small Farm or Backyard Flock, You Can Design and Build Your Own Portable Chicken Coop, Start a Chicken Broiler Business on Your Small Farm, Keep Your Chicken Coop Smelling Fresh and Clean, 6 Poultry Health Problems (and How to Deal With Them). How do I keep chicks safe from black rat snakes? Even if rats and mice do get into it - and they have a nasty habit if finding a way through the tiniest of holes - it's nowhere near where they can do damage to your flock. Another option is to use electric net fencing to protect your chickens. Best of luck to you Coyotes, bobcats, stray dogs, cats, hawks, snakes, skunks, raccoons, possums, ferrets… there is a long list of potential predators that would happily make a meal of your backyard ducks or chickens … You might want to electrify the perimeter. Bobcats might be steered away from a location if they are sprayed heavily and repeatedly with water. You may need to invest in a taller fence, and ensure your chickens' run has a roof over the top. Build the right structures to keep predators out. Like most carnivores, bobcats are exceedingly shy, reclusive and rarely seen. Step two, construct an enclosure that prevents the bobcat from accessing the chickens until it is no longer hunting in your area. If you have such a pond and want to keep bobcats from fishing out prize turtles or fish, set up a MOTION ACTIVATED WATER SPRAYER. Elevate the coop off the ground to help prevent mice, rats, and weasels from getting into the coop. Bobcats do not usually threaten people, though they may occasionally snatch a chicken or turkey from a farmer's barnyard. Put lights around the coop at night; motion-sensor lights work well. These devices use a motion detector which is able to “see” 24 hours a day. Their sense of smell and eyesight is keen for hunting at night or during the day. The first order of business is to have a secure coop with a door that shuts securely at night. We know ads can be annoying, but they’re what allow us to make all of wikiHow available for free. There are 12 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page. Live Traps. Include your email address to get a message when this question is answered. A little extravagant for your average backyard poultry keeper but maybe worth thinking about for smallholders. Another way to protect your poultry from bobcats is by using human urine around your chicken coop. There is a catch about dogs, however. As you can imagine, a chicken – or even several chickens – stand no chance against a bobcat if it is able to get close enough to grab a hold of them. You can accomplish this by manually shutting and locking the coop door yourself or by assigning the task to others. The final layer of predator protection is a gun. If your cat seems aggressive towards chickens, even after controlled interactions, you should not let the cat outdoors near the chickens. Without getting into the politics of gun ownership, shooting the offending animal or firing a shotgun in the direction of the offending predator will certainly scare away or get rid of the problem. If you are new to raising chickens, you might not even be aware of what predators are around. Step 4: Keep your coop and run clean. One thing to remember: chicken wire will keep chickens in; hardware mesh will keep predators out. As always, prevention is always better than cure and the best way to keep away coyotes from your chicken coop is by ensuring that your chicken coop is coyote proof. Smart chickens learn quickly to take cover if danger is circling overhead. Inspect the bottom of the coop and patch any holes where predators could gain entry. I am A farm girl and I am deaply attached to animals. When you see chickens wander into your garden, give them a quick spray with a standard garden hose. Every day a chicken or goats gets taken away by a bobcat and there is nothing I can do since I am only 15 years old. Read our Bobcats and coyotes are fantastic jumpers and can easily clear 4-foot-high fences, so build your enclosure appropriately tall, or add a cover net to keep the varmints from vaulting the fence. Dig a trench 12 inches deep around the entire coop and bury hardware cloth there. wikiHow is where trusted research and expert knowledge come together. Put a roof on it. It worked thankfully. Protecting chickens requires a little forethought and some regular maintenance. Ensure your coop is less attractive to coyotes as much as possible by eliminating garbage and dog food from your coop. Question by Sharon Rose: How do you keep you goats and chickens safe from bobcats? You do not want to end up electrocuting yourself while building the fence. But you must do it every night, for it only takes once for a raccoon to get in and destroy your flock. They will chase off everything from the mailman to coyotes. You should also make sure to release animals like skunks and raccoons far away from other people's homes. You may need to invest in a taller fence, and ensure your chickens' run has a roof over the top. Bury it a few inches below the ground's surface. When building your run, make sure you bury hardware mesh at least 2 feet deep around the compound- 4 feet deep would be ideal. Guineas are not quiet animals, and you cannot train them to pipe down like you can with (some) dogs. Squirrels are said capable of carrying diseases that pass on through their urine, such as Weil's Disease. If you have chickens or fowl, ensure they are put up at night. Clean up any food scraps that the chickens do not eat before nightfall. Purchase a humane and specifically-built trap from a hardware or ranch store to trap any imposing snakes that enter the coop. If you do not give this issue attention, unfortunately, you may have a gruesome discovery come morning when you feed the flock. Instead, invest in a welded wire hardware cloth. Keep your compost pile far away from the coop. In the past, we have lost numerous chickens to hawk attacks here on the homestead. All cats are different. Introducing "One Thing": A New Video Series, The Spruce Gardening & Plant Care Review Board, The Spruce Renovations and Repair Review Board. Still, guinea fowl come with an added benefit: these birds will eat every bug you can imagine that might plague the garden and barnyard from ticks to flies. When a hawk tries to dive through the wire or mesh, it becomes entangled, and your chickens have time to run away. Add an angle at the top facing outward at 45 degrees, and 16 inches in width. Bobcats are notorious for leaping at a high level and climbing fences. Last Updated: September 8, 2020 Discover how to keep chickens safe from predators the natural way! Reinforce any openings with chicken wire, since small mammals, like weasels, can easily get through tiny spaces, but it is hard for them to get through the little holes in chicken wire. We've recently had a bobcat coming into our fenced yard at night and attacking our chickens. Is there any way your family can bobcat proof the chicken coop. If anything is taking them during the day a livestock guardian dog or even other dog breeds can protect them. They also have a powerful sense of smell and hearing, so they’ll be aware from a long distance away if you have chickens. It is similar to chicken wire but sturdier. To learn how to use a cat or dog to guard your chickens, scroll down! The young Llama grows up with the flock and sees them as ‘family’ and will apparently chase foxes away! You can prevent squirrels from populating the area by keeping food secured away in plastic storage containers, or setting up humane traps, if legal in your state. Do not leave small pets outdoors unattended or in a poorly-enclosed yard. Chicken wire helps keep your chickens in but won't always keep predators out, so it's important to purchase a tough wire with smaller holes. I realized it was a hawk and pointed it out to my dogs so they’d begin to bark and scare it away. Can squirrels pass disease onto chickens? Lauren Arcuri is a freelance writer and an experienced small farmer. Hawks can be hard on a flock of chickens. I am a podcaster who is starting to put videos out on YouTube. Use chicken wire or hardware cloth as an effective barrier against predatory birds. Install Motion-Activated Lights Their sharp claws come out during the hunt to make the kill. Provide lots of hiding spots. Other tips include: Electric fencing can be a good option for securing poultry. It's completely enclosed. Avoid chicken wire, as this material is designed to keep chickens in rather than keeping predators out. This is not to keep the chickens in but to keep the predators out. Generally, any creature can pass on disease to poultry, especially wild rodents. Clean out the coop every day since uneaten chicken feed can attract predators. Learn tips for creating your most beautiful (and bountiful) garden ever. Thanks to all authors for creating a page that has been read 66,489 times. We reinforced the coop door so the rest are safe, but when I go out in the morning to open the coop there are fresh tracks in the dirt. If the weasel was not dispatched it is highly likely it would have come back night after night to feast on nicely fatted hens. Use a fine mesh hardware cloth (1/2” to 1/4”) to fence the coop which is more effective in preventing bobcats from reaching into it. If you maintain a coop of chickens or are planning to, then one thing you always have to think about is coop security and how best to guard against predators. New cats and kittens can be introduced to chickens gradually, especially at a young age. Here are the most common chicken predators: Some predators, like snakes and rats, are only likely to eat baby chicks or half-grown pullets, not full-grown birds. Like domestic cats, bobcats have excellent vision, even at night time. I recommend it. References. To prevent a canine catastrophe, if you get a livestock guardian puppy, be sure to supervise its interactions with your chickens when it is young, and correct it any time it gives chase to your feathered farm animals. Live traps are another option, but many chicken owners choose to avoid this until they’ve directly observed a predator attacking their flock. Use fencing to deter bobcats. Bobcats can also use their claws in any openings of your coop to snatch chickens. Many of these animals steer clear of civilization; others pose a very real threat to pets. Or you can bury the hardware cloth straight down 12-18 inches deep into the ground. The Bobcat ranked number 9 in our Worst Predator Poll! Llamas apparently keep foxes away by driving them off. Some dogs, playful creatures that they are, just love to chase and tease chickens. If you have a serious problem with hawks and owls, consider covering the chicken run with hawk netting. Dogs are great protectors of the small farm or homestead and will keep everything from sheep to cattle to baby chicks safe from marauding predators including other dogs. wikiHow's Content Management Team carefully monitors the work from our editorial staff to ensure that each article is backed by trusted research and meets our high quality standards. So, what animals should you protect your chickens against? It seems that nearly every wild creature, and many domestic ones, can appreciate a delicious chicken dinner. There are some simple steps you can take to protect your precious hens from predation. Take a look at the results here! Consider motion-controlled spraying as well. Reinforce the coop windows with tough wire, and the run as well. It is hard to determine if a hawk has preyed upon your chickens. They don’t leave much of a trace because they are able to carry your chickens off without much disturbance. Urine from other species can be beneficial in repelling bobcats and other animals. Avoid chicken wire, as this material is designed to keep chickens in rather than keeping predators out. they have a broad range and the birds need secure housing and runs. Predators are stopped, right down to the ground, and the management system of moving your chickens to fresh pasture seems to be an additional effective deterrent. All tip submissions are carefully reviewed before being published, This article was co-authored by our trained team of editors and researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. Can you keep them in a barn instead of a pen? There are several ways to set it up. While you’re removing perch spots which are high up, don’t remove hiding spots for your chickens. As featured in Backyard Poultry & The Chicken Whisperer, PredatorPee's chicken coop predator protection products work to keep your flock safe.Because chickens have a weak sense of smell, urine from animals like bobcats, coyotes, and wolves does not effect them at all - but the pests will stay away! Chickens can be out during the day but return to the coop which is locked at night to insure their safety. Start off by inspecting the coop for damaged or weakening wood that could be used as access points by snakes. This article was co-authored by our trained team of editors and researchers who validated it for accuracy and comprehensiveness. Keep the water pressure light so that it scares the chickens without hurting them. Guns can serve a purpose on the homestead and a farm. But domestic animals can be chicken killers, too. Weasels are notorious for entering coops through small openings. It's important to check your coop frequently for any nooks or crannies, as predators can easily take advantage. The first method is to have a static coop and run an electric wire around the bottom of the coop in such a way that even digging predators cannot get in. If you find that the chicken wire holes/opening are too wide, and the wire infirm, upgrade to 1/4" hardware cloth. You should bury about six inches of fencing wire under the ground to protect your chickens. Please help us continue to provide you with our trusted how-to guides and videos for free by whitelisting wikiHow on your ad blocker. Choose from bear urine, bobcat urine and more. Letting them out at random will ensure the hawks remain cautious. A determined, hungry animal can and will break through chicken wire. Have them interact through a fence or enclosure for a few weeks. Please help! Bobcats are the most common and widely distributed wild feline in the lower 48 states; the animals adapt well to human presence as long as they have sanctuary. Hardware cloth is a small, sturdy mesh product sold in rolls at your local hardware store. There are other ways to protect poultry and some of them will work for any animal on the farm. wikiHow's. For example, a weasel was shot and killed after eating the faces off of several hens in the coop. An open field without cover is a deterrent to predators. They hunt by going directly for the chicken’s head or jugular to kill them. This will prevent digging predators. A large breed dog that gets on well with your chickens can be an excellent deterrent from not only birds of prey, but other predators. I'm not sure about the goats. But beware, their protection comes with a noisy price. Planting bushes and allowing your chickens access under decks and overhangs is essential when they free range. Bobcats can also use their claws in any openings of your coop to snatch chickens. Fish and Game may trap the cat if it’s been found killing livestock, and relocate it …

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